Op-Ed: Toronto can easily do more for Non-Status children

My colleagues and I published an op-ed recently on non-status childrens’ experiences with Parks and Recreation, as well as other city services.

You can view the piece here

The article features a recent community-based study published by the Rights of Non-Status Women’s Network on challenges accessing city services for non-status families in Toronto, despite Toronto’s Sanctuary City policy. View the report here.

It also features a report from No One Is Illegal Toronto, as well as research from Ryerson University on Access T.O.

It was a delight working with Petra Molnar and Stephanie J. Silverman on the op. ed. and I’m looking forward to future collaborations.

 

Addressing Risk & Uncertainty in Migration ~ Workshop Agenda

Our workshop agenda has just been announced, and we’re very excited about the presentations. We have a limited number of spots available for faculty, students and/or community members who want to participate in the discussion. Contact me for details on how to register.

Salina

AGENDA
Addressing Risk and Uncertainty in Migration: Theory, Processes, and Policy Responses
Thursday, May 18, 2017 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Munk School of Global Affairs, 1 Devonshire Place, Room 208N, University of Toronto

10:00 a.m. Registration & Refreshments
10:05 a.m. Opening Remarks
Can Aybek and Salina Abji

10:15 a.m. Panel 1
Governing Risk or Risky Governance? Historical, Comparative and Policy Perspectives
~ Harold Bauder & Dayana Gonzalez, Ryerson University: “Responses to ‘illegality’: Urban Sanctuary in International Comparison”
~ Geraldina Polanco, University of Waterloo: “‘Illegality’ and the ‘Benefits’ of Managed Migration Programs”
~ Jiyoung Lee-An, Carleton University: “’Fake’ or ‘Real’ Marriage? Governing Practices of Spousal Immigration in Canada”
~ Maximilian Smith, York University: “Making Room for Social Psychiatry and Sociology in Historical Studies of Migration and Mental Health”
Discussant: Can Aybek, University of Toronto

12:30 p.m. Catered Lunch with Keynote Presentation
Featuring: Dr. Anna Korteweg
The Risks of “Immigrant Integration”: The Racialized Gendered Production of Non-Belonging

Anna Korteweg is Professor and Chair of Sociology at the University of Toronto Mississauga. Professor Korteweg’s research focuses on the ways in which the problem of immigrant integration is constructed in the intersections of gender, religion, ethnicity and national origin. From this critical vantage point, she has analyzed debates surrounding the wearing of the headscarf, so-called “honour-based” violence, and Sharia law. Current research projects focus on racialization and LGBTQ/gender rights construction in refugee politics, on the criminalization of migrant status, and on the citizenship implications of refugee sponsorship.

1:45 p.m. Panel 2:
Negotiating Uncertainty: Lived Experiences of Vulnerability and Risk
~ Jolin Joseph, York University: “Right to Flight: Gendered Im/mobility in the Recruitment and Regulation of Indian Women Migrants”
~ Kathryn Dennler, York University: “‘I try to live my life’: Affective geographies of migrants with liminal immigration status”
~ Sohoon Lee, University of Sydney: “Using markets and kinship to cross spatio-temporal borders: a Case of Korean-Chinese migrants in South Korea”
~ Marie Coligado, Carleton University: “‘What you do is you do your best’: Challenges to Legal Representation of Immigration Detainees”
Discussant: Salina Abji, Carleton University

3:45 p.m. Facilitated Discussion: Journal Special Issue

4:30 p.m. Dinner for Presenters ~ By invitation only

A limited number of spaces are available ~ please contact Salina Abji and Can Aybek for more details.
salina.abji AT mail.utoronto.ca and c.aybek ATutoronto.ca

Good news in Immigration: Spousal Sponsorship no longer “conditional”

The Trudeau government has kept its election promise to repeal conditional status for sponsored spouses. This is good news. The two-year condition, which was introduced by the former Conservative government under Harper, was highly problematic particularly for sponsored spouses at risk interpersonal or familial violence.

Congratulations to all of the advocates who worked tirelessly to ensure this condition was removed! We will be celebrating at our upcoming Forum on Sanctuary Cities and the Future of Regularization on May 24th at the University of Toronto.

 

Details on the changes are available here.

Media coverage highlighting the role of advocates: Advocates hail end to ‘conditional’ spousal visas

To read more about the UofT study highlighted in media coverage, see the Migrant Mothers Project

 

 

Addressing Risk & Uncertainty in Migration ~ Workshop at the Munk School May 18, 2017

Can Aybek and I are co-hosting a research workshop on Addressing Risk and Uncertainty in Migration: Theory, Processes & Policy Responses at the Munk School, University of Toronto, on Thursday, May 18, 2017.

We were impressed by the quality and number of submissions received for the workshop. Invitations have just gone out today to a handful of applicants based on quality, fit, and potential for publication. It promises to be an exciting and enriching day of research and dialogue!

The workshop will be open to the pubic (with limited seating available) so stay tuned here for more details.

Learn more about the Munk School of Global Affairs

Read the original Call for Papers

Emerging Scholars Colloquium with Salina Abji

I’m looking forward to presenting my research at the upcoming Emerging Scholars Colloquium at Carleton University on Tuesday, March 28, 2017.

“Because Deportation is Violence Against Women!”
Activism in Response to Precarious Migration and the Securitization of Women’s Shelters in Canada

SSS - Protest in Toronto - Oct 2008 - large res

Shelter | Sanctuary | Status campaign, Toronto, 2008. Source: NOII

In 2011, the Canadian Border Services Agency (CBSA) issued a national directive effectively allowing border guards to enter women’s shelters to investigate and deport “unauthorized” migrants. The policy was implemented despite significant protests from a national coalition of over 200 feminist and migrant rights organizations. In this presentation, I will share findings from my doctoral dissertation, where I analyzed the politics of state responsibility that are produced through such contestations over border enforcement within women’s shelters. State responsibility is a legal principle outlining the human rights obligations of states under international law, including women’s human rights to protection from gender-based violence. However, it is less clear to what extent a state’s obligations extend to women without legal status, who are not formally recognized by the state but who may nevertheless require access to shelter and support services. In my presentation, I’ll discuss two key framing strategies used by activists to prevent border authorities from entering women’s shelters, and the implications of these strategies for how we conceptualize gendered violence and women’s human rights. I’ll also present my analysis of the CBSA’s justification for entering women’s shelters, showing how the state’s use of securitized understandings of responsibility fundamentally undermine the human rights of all women in Canada, including those without status.

March 28, 2017 at 10:00 AM to 11:30 AM

Location: A715 Loeb Building
Cost: Free
Audience: Anyone
Contact Email: soc-anthro@carleton.ca
Contact Phone: 613-520-2582

View the Event Poster

Check out the event listing

Sociologists for Women in Society ~ Winter Meeting in Albuquerque

The theme of this year’s SWS meeting was Intersectionality and Privilege. The highlights for me were presentations by Brenda J Allen on how to Praxis what we Preach, and the Sisters of Color session on Collective Healing.

SWS meetings are also a great opportunity to network with more senior scholars and to build relationships with feminist scholars across North America and (to a lesser extent) internationally.

Learn more about SWS here 

It was also my first time visiting New Mexico. I’m pictured here with my lovely conference buddy, Paulina, along with snapshots of some of the many murals you can find downtown. I also enjoyed riding the local buses and chatting with folks I met along the way.

sws

Conferencing with Paulina ~ Favourite Street Murals

Our day trip to the Sandia Mountains was also a highlight and offered some much-needed respite for my nature-loving spirit 🙂

Sandia Mountains

Sandia Mountains ~ Divine