Alex Janvier Exhibit at the National Art Gallery of Canada

Alex Janvier Exhibit

National Art Gallery of Canada

In March I had the opportunity to visit the Alex Janvier exhibit at the National Art Gallery of Canada.

“My art is truly North American… it has its Indigenous roots. Some of my artwork is healing for myself and for anyone who wants to accept it that way.” ~ Alex Janvier

It was a breathtaking and inspirational experience. Janvier is perhaps best known for his circular watercolours, and they were certainly delightful to see in person. However, I was most moved by his more political work documenting his experience in the Indian Residential School system in Canada, as well as his more recent critiques of environmental degradation and struggles over Indigenous sovereignty.

I was also taken aback by a series of paintings done with oil on linen (pictured here). My favourite was his work called “Fly, Fly, Fly” painted in 1981, which seemed to depict a magical creature “hovering on the surface of the canvas”.

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From Alex Janvier’s ‘Fly Fly Fly’ (1981)

You can view the exhibition website here

To learn more about Janvier, visit his offical website

 

 

Emerging Scholars Colloquium with Salina Abji

I’m looking forward to presenting my research at the upcoming Emerging Scholars Colloquium at Carleton University on Tuesday, March 28, 2017.

“Because Deportation is Violence Against Women!”
Activism in Response to Precarious Migration and the Securitization of Women’s Shelters in Canada

SSS - Protest in Toronto - Oct 2008 - large res

Shelter | Sanctuary | Status campaign, Toronto, 2008. Source: NOII

In 2011, the Canadian Border Services Agency (CBSA) issued a national directive effectively allowing border guards to enter women’s shelters to investigate and deport “unauthorized” migrants. The policy was implemented despite significant protests from a national coalition of over 200 feminist and migrant rights organizations. In this presentation, I will share findings from my doctoral dissertation, where I analyzed the politics of state responsibility that are produced through such contestations over border enforcement within women’s shelters. State responsibility is a legal principle outlining the human rights obligations of states under international law, including women’s human rights to protection from gender-based violence. However, it is less clear to what extent a state’s obligations extend to women without legal status, who are not formally recognized by the state but who may nevertheless require access to shelter and support services. In my presentation, I’ll discuss two key framing strategies used by activists to prevent border authorities from entering women’s shelters, and the implications of these strategies for how we conceptualize gendered violence and women’s human rights. I’ll also present my analysis of the CBSA’s justification for entering women’s shelters, showing how the state’s use of securitized understandings of responsibility fundamentally undermine the human rights of all women in Canada, including those without status.

March 28, 2017 at 10:00 AM to 11:30 AM

Location: A715 Loeb Building
Cost: Free
Audience: Anyone
Contact Email: soc-anthro@carleton.ca
Contact Phone: 613-520-2582

View the Event Poster

Check out the event listing