Alex Janvier Exhibit at the National Art Gallery of Canada

Alex Janvier Exhibit

National Art Gallery of Canada

In March I had the opportunity to visit the Alex Janvier exhibit at the National Art Gallery of Canada.

“My art is truly North American… it has its Indigenous roots. Some of my artwork is healing for myself and for anyone who wants to accept it that way.” ~ Alex Janvier

It was a breathtaking and inspirational experience. Janvier is perhaps best known for his circular watercolours, and they were certainly delightful to see in person. However, I was most moved by his more political work documenting his experience in the Indian Residential School system in Canada, as well as his more recent critiques of environmental degradation and struggles over Indigenous sovereignty.

I was also taken aback by a series of paintings done with oil on linen (pictured here). My favourite was his work called “Fly, Fly, Fly” painted in 1981, which seemed to depict a magical creature “hovering on the surface of the canvas”.

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From Alex Janvier’s ‘Fly Fly Fly’ (1981)

You can view the exhibition website here

To learn more about Janvier, visit his offical website

 

 

“Shame and Prejudice: A Story of Resilience” by Kent Monkman

 

This exhibit will change the way you look at Canada’s 150-year celebrations this year. I highly recommend it!

I found it deeply moving, smart & timely.

“There’s a Canadian myth about itself that doesn’t include what happened to indigenous people, and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission has shone a lot of light on that. And now I think Canadians are learning what was behind this policy of removing children from communities. What has that meant? That has meant generations of trauma that we’re still recovering from.” ~ Kent Monkman at the Gallery exhibit in Toronto, as quoted in NOW magazine.

Read the article feature in NOW magazine

Learn more about the talented Kent Monkman

The exhibition will be travelling across Canada in case you missed it in Toronto:

Shame & Prejudice: A Story of Resilience
Glenbow Museum
Calgary, AB
June 17 – September 10, 2017

Shame & Prejudice: A Story of Resilience
Agnes Etherington Art Centre
Kingston, ON
January 2018

Shame & Prejudice: A Story of Resilience
Confederation Centre of the Arts
Charlottetown, PE
June 2018

Shame & Prejudice: A Story of Resilience
Art Gallery of Nova Scotia
Halifax, NS
October 2018

Shame & Prejudice: A Story of Resilience
The Galerie de l’UQAM
Montreal, QC
January 2019

Shame & Prejudice: A Story of Resilience
Tom Thomson Art Gallery
Owen Sound, ON
Summer 2019

Shame & Prejudice: A Story of Resilience
Winnipeg Art Gallery
Winnipeg, MB
October 2019

Shame & Prejudice: A Story of Resilience
Museum of Anthropology
Vancouver, BC
April 2020

Sociologists for Women in Society ~ Winter Meeting in Albuquerque

The theme of this year’s SWS meeting was Intersectionality and Privilege. The highlights for me were presentations by Brenda J Allen on how to Praxis what we Preach, and the Sisters of Color session on Collective Healing.

SWS meetings are also a great opportunity to network with more senior scholars and to build relationships with feminist scholars across North America and (to a lesser extent) internationally.

Learn more about SWS here 

It was also my first time visiting New Mexico. I’m pictured here with my lovely conference buddy, Paulina, along with snapshots of some of the many murals you can find downtown. I also enjoyed riding the local buses and chatting with folks I met along the way.

sws

Conferencing with Paulina ~ Favourite Street Murals

Our day trip to the Sandia Mountains was also a highlight and offered some much-needed respite for my nature-loving spirit 🙂

Sandia Mountains

Sandia Mountains ~ Divine