Addressing Risk & Uncertainty in Migration ~ Workshop at the Munk School May 18, 2017

Can Aybek and I are co-hosting a research workshop on Addressing Risk and Uncertainty in Migration: Theory, Processes & Policy Responses at the Munk School, University of Toronto, on Thursday, May 18, 2017.

We were impressed by the quality and number of submissions received for the workshop. Invitations have just gone out today to a handful of applicants based on quality, fit, and potential for publication. It promises to be an exciting and enriching day of research and dialogue!

The workshop will be open to the pubic (with limited seating available) so stay tuned here for more details.

Learn more about the Munk School of Global Affairs

Read the original Call for Papers

Sanctuary Cities & the Future of Regularization ~ A community forum

The Rights of Non-Status Women’s Network (RNSWN) is hosting our 2017 Spring Forum at the University of Toronto on Wednesday, May 24, 2017.

Come Through!

Spring Forum Time

Spring Forum Time ~ Source: RNSWN

DESCRIPTION

Please join us for our spring forum, a biannual networking and information sharing event. The forum’s morning panel will present individuals’ and front line workers’ struggles and strategies to gain access to City of Toronto services for people without immigration status. The afternoon panel will discuss a variety of approaches and strategies on status regularization for people with no legal immigration status. We welcome your questions for all our panellists in open Q&A sessions at the end of each panel and invite you to network over a delicious lunch break.

9:30 to 10:00 Registration and Networking

10:00 to 12:30 Panel on Sanctuary City Toronto with speakers from Research Institutions, City Officials, and Social Service Organizations

12:30 to 1:30 Lunch & Networking

1:30 to 3:30 Panel on The Future of Regularization with speakers from Refugee, Legal, and Grassroots Advocates

3:30 to 4:00 Wrap Up and Discussion

Suggested Donation (for operational costs) to be paid in cash at the door. A receipt can be provided.

• Non-Students: $5-10

• Students are free. Please bring your student I.D.

Please RSVP by Friday May 19th as spaces are limited ~ Thank You!

Thank you to Migrant Mothers Project, South Asian Legal Clinic of Ontario, FCJ, and Springtide Resources who have generously supported this symposium.

~ Space is fully wheelchair accessible. Please let us know of any accessibility needs in advance so that we can do our best to accommodate them.

DATE AND TIME

Wed, 24 May 2017

9:30 AM – 4:00 PM EDT

LOCATION

University of Toronto- Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work

246 Bloor Street West

3rd Floor- Student Lounge

Toronto, ON M5S

RSVP on Event Brite

Alex Janvier Exhibit at the National Art Gallery of Canada

Alex Janvier Exhibit

National Art Gallery of Canada

In March I had the opportunity to visit the Alex Janvier exhibit at the National Art Gallery of Canada.

“My art is truly North American… it has its Indigenous roots. Some of my artwork is healing for myself and for anyone who wants to accept it that way.” ~ Alex Janvier

It was a breathtaking and inspirational experience. Janvier is perhaps best known for his circular watercolours, and they were certainly delightful to see in person. However, I was most moved by his more political work documenting his experience in the Indian Residential School system in Canada, as well as his more recent critiques of environmental degradation and struggles over Indigenous sovereignty.

I was also taken aback by a series of paintings done with oil on linen (pictured here). My favourite was his work called “Fly, Fly, Fly” painted in 1981, which seemed to depict a magical creature “hovering on the surface of the canvas”.

2017-03-28 14.50.02

From Alex Janvier’s ‘Fly Fly Fly’ (1981)

You can view the exhibition website here

To learn more about Janvier, visit his offical website

 

 

Emerging Scholars Colloquium with Salina Abji

I’m looking forward to presenting my research at the upcoming Emerging Scholars Colloquium at Carleton University on Tuesday, March 28, 2017.

“Because Deportation is Violence Against Women!”
Activism in Response to Precarious Migration and the Securitization of Women’s Shelters in Canada

SSS - Protest in Toronto - Oct 2008 - large res

Shelter | Sanctuary | Status campaign, Toronto, 2008. Source: NOII

In 2011, the Canadian Border Services Agency (CBSA) issued a national directive effectively allowing border guards to enter women’s shelters to investigate and deport “unauthorized” migrants. The policy was implemented despite significant protests from a national coalition of over 200 feminist and migrant rights organizations. In this presentation, I will share findings from my doctoral dissertation, where I analyzed the politics of state responsibility that are produced through such contestations over border enforcement within women’s shelters. State responsibility is a legal principle outlining the human rights obligations of states under international law, including women’s human rights to protection from gender-based violence. However, it is less clear to what extent a state’s obligations extend to women without legal status, who are not formally recognized by the state but who may nevertheless require access to shelter and support services. In my presentation, I’ll discuss two key framing strategies used by activists to prevent border authorities from entering women’s shelters, and the implications of these strategies for how we conceptualize gendered violence and women’s human rights. I’ll also present my analysis of the CBSA’s justification for entering women’s shelters, showing how the state’s use of securitized understandings of responsibility fundamentally undermine the human rights of all women in Canada, including those without status.

March 28, 2017 at 10:00 AM to 11:30 AM

Location: A715 Loeb Building
Cost: Free
Audience: Anyone
Contact Email: soc-anthro@carleton.ca
Contact Phone: 613-520-2582

View the Event Poster

Check out the event listing

“Shame and Prejudice: A Story of Resilience” by Kent Monkman

 

This exhibit will change the way you look at Canada’s 150-year celebrations this year. I highly recommend it!

I found it deeply moving, smart & timely.

“There’s a Canadian myth about itself that doesn’t include what happened to indigenous people, and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission has shone a lot of light on that. And now I think Canadians are learning what was behind this policy of removing children from communities. What has that meant? That has meant generations of trauma that we’re still recovering from.” ~ Kent Monkman at the Gallery exhibit in Toronto, as quoted in NOW magazine.

Read the article feature in NOW magazine

Learn more about the talented Kent Monkman

The exhibition will be travelling across Canada in case you missed it in Toronto:

Shame & Prejudice: A Story of Resilience
Glenbow Museum
Calgary, AB
June 17 – September 10, 2017

Shame & Prejudice: A Story of Resilience
Agnes Etherington Art Centre
Kingston, ON
January 2018

Shame & Prejudice: A Story of Resilience
Confederation Centre of the Arts
Charlottetown, PE
June 2018

Shame & Prejudice: A Story of Resilience
Art Gallery of Nova Scotia
Halifax, NS
October 2018

Shame & Prejudice: A Story of Resilience
The Galerie de l’UQAM
Montreal, QC
January 2019

Shame & Prejudice: A Story of Resilience
Tom Thomson Art Gallery
Owen Sound, ON
Summer 2019

Shame & Prejudice: A Story of Resilience
Winnipeg Art Gallery
Winnipeg, MB
October 2019

Shame & Prejudice: A Story of Resilience
Museum of Anthropology
Vancouver, BC
April 2020

Sociologists for Women in Society ~ Winter Meeting in Albuquerque

The theme of this year’s SWS meeting was Intersectionality and Privilege. The highlights for me were presentations by Brenda J Allen on how to Praxis what we Preach, and the Sisters of Color session on Collective Healing.

SWS meetings are also a great opportunity to network with more senior scholars and to build relationships with feminist scholars across North America and (to a lesser extent) internationally.

Learn more about SWS here 

It was also my first time visiting New Mexico. I’m pictured here with my lovely conference buddy, Paulina, along with snapshots of some of the many murals you can find downtown. I also enjoyed riding the local buses and chatting with folks I met along the way.

sws

Conferencing with Paulina ~ Favourite Street Murals

Our day trip to the Sandia Mountains was also a highlight and offered some much-needed respite for my nature-loving spirit 🙂

Sandia Mountains

Sandia Mountains ~ Divine

 

Women’s March #TO

womens march love trumps hate

Love Trumps Hate at the Women’s March | Toronto | Pictured here with family & friends ❤

The Women’s March on Washington had me thinking about this quote by Howard Zinn…

“Revolutionary change does not come as one cataclysmic moment (beware of such moments!) but as an endless succession of surprises, moving zigzag toward a more decent society. We don’t have to engage in grand, heroic actions to participate in the process of change. Small acts, when multiplied by millions of people, can transform the world. Even when we don’t “win,” there is fun and fulfillment in the fact that we have been involved, with other good people, in something worthwhile. We need hope.

An optimist isn’t necessarily a blithe, slightly sappy whistler in the dark of our time. To be hopeful in bad times is not just foolishly romantic. It is based on the fact that human history is a history not only of cruelty but also of compassion, sacrifice, courage, kindness. What we choose to emphasize in this complex history will determine our lives. If we see only the worst, it destroys our capacity to do something. If we remember those times and places–and there are so many–where people have behaved magnificently, this gives us the energy to act, and at least the possibility of sending this spinning top of a world in a different direction. And if we do act, in however small a way, we don’t have to wait for some grand utopian future. The future is an infinite succession of presents, and to live now as we think human beings should live, in defiance of all that is bad around us, is itself a marvelous victory.” 

Were you able to attend?

The March in Toronto was a powerful and energizing display of collective resistance and optimism.

As far as #feministfutures go, this was a milestone moment for me, full of wit and creativity and community.

womens march

Feminist Futures ❤